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More action needed to meet energy goals by...

The current pace of progress on three global energy goals – access to electricity, renewable energy and efficiency – is not moving fast enough to meet 2030 targets, according to the latest Global Tracking Framework (GTF) report released today by the World Bank and the International Energy Agency as part of the Sustainable Energy for All Knowledge Hub.

The post More action needed to meet energy goals by 2030, new report finds appeared first on United Nations Sustainable Development.

Using aviation biofuels could reduce aircraft...

Mon 20 Mar 2017 – Using biofuels to help power jet engines reduces particle emissions in their exhaust by as much as 50 to 70 per cent and so can help reduce contrail formations that produce climate warming effects, say research scientists led by NASA. The findings, published in the journal Nature, follow a series of flight tests undertaken in 2013 and 2014 as part of the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions Study, or ACCESS, in which NASA partnered with the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Research Council Canada (NRC). The tests involved flying NASA’s workhorse DC-8 as high as 40,000 feet while its four engines burned a 50/50 blend of conventional jet fuel mixed with camelina-derived biofuel. A trio of research aircraft took turns to fly behind the aircraft at distances ranging from 300 feet to more than 20 miles to take measurements and study contrail formation.

Incidents of severe aircraft turbulence likely...

Wed 12 Apr 2017 – Incidents of severe aircraft turbulence on transatlantic routes are likely to become twice or even three times more common as a result of climate change, finds a new study from the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading in the UK. The study used supercomputer simulations of the atmosphere to calculate how wintertime transatlantic clear-air turbulence would change at an aircraft’s cruising altitude of around 39,000 feet (12 km) in response to a doubling in the concentration of CO2 levels in the atmosphere, which scientists predict will occur later this century. The results show the average amount of light turbulence increasing by 59 per cent, rising to 149 per cent for severe turbulence. A significant number of injuries to passengers and crew already take place each year, as well as damage to aircraft, and the study concludes an intensification of clear-air turbulence could have important consequences for aviation.